Bodily Injury & Fatalities

Definition of Catastrophic Injuries

Broadly speaking, Schedule 4, Section 70(1) of the Manitoba Public Insurance Act states that a person is catastrophically injured if they suffer:

  • Quadriplegia or paraplegia – complete or incomplete, that meets the criteria for classification as Grade A or B on the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale and results in an impairment of 65 per cent or more.
  • Two or more amputations, such as shoulder/arm or pelvis/hip/thigh, including disfigurement.
  • Loss of functional vision (impairment of 80 per cent or more).
  • Functional alteration of the brain resulting in a determined impairment of 50 per cent or more.
  • Psychiatric injury requiring supervision in an institutional or confined setting for 50 per cent or more of the time and with a determined impairment of 70 per cent or more.
  • Severe burns, resulting in consequential impairments, excluding scarring or disfigurement to all surface areas of the body other than the face, that are determined to result in a degree of permanent impairment of 75 per cent or more.
  • A combination of any of the following impairments totaling 80 per cent or more:
  • Single amputation, such as shoulder, arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee or below the knee.
  • Quadriplegia or paraplegia - complete or incomplete, that meets the criteria for classification as Grade C or D on the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale with partial preservation of motor power
  • Loss of functional vision impairment between 50 and 80 per cent.
  • Functional alteration of the brain resulting in a determined impairment of 30 per cent or more.
  • Severe brachial plexus injuries.
  • Psychiatric injury requiring supervision in an institutional or confined setting for 50 per cent or more of the time and with a determined impairment of 35 per cent.
  • Severe burns, resulting in consequential impairments, excluding scarring or disfigurement to all surface areas other than the face, that are determined to result in a degree of permanent impairment of 40 per cent or more.
  • Another injury that is prescribed in the regulations as being catastrophic.

Please be advised that this list does not outline all of the specific qualifiers for the Catastrophic Injury designation. Your case manager can review the impairment schedule with you as to whether you meet the requirements specified in the legislation.

The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Scale

Spinal cord injuries must be classified according to the ASIA scale as follows:

ASIA Grade A = Complete: No sensory or motor function is preserved below the neurological level of the lesion (including the sacral segments).

ASIA Grade B = Incomplete: There is preservation of sensation only with no motor preservation below the neurological level of the lesion.

ASIA Grade C = Incomplete: There is preservation of some motor function below the neurological level of the lesion, and the majority of the key muscles below the neurological level have a muscle grade less than 3.

ASIA Grade D = Incomplete: There is preservation of some motor function below the neurological level of the lesion, and the majority of the key muscles below the neurological level have a muscle grade greater than or equal to 3.

ASIA Grade E = Normal: More and sensory function is normal.